Trends


Tech trends for 2014 – Cityline

As aired on Cityline, Tuesday, Dec. 17, 2013, on City.

As always, you can watch previous episodes of Cityline at Citytv.com, or via the City Video iOS or Android apps! Cityline airs 9 a.m. on City across Canada. Check Citytv.com for all television air times across the country.


CES 2013: Larger-than-life TVs in your living room

TheDigitalLife_UHDTVThe Consumer Electronics Show (CES), happening now through Friday, Jan. 11 in Las Vegas, NV, is where electronics companies like LG and Sony are unveiling the latest technology trends taking over the consumer technology market in the upcoming year.

Each year, several trends set an overtone to what consumers may see in homes around the world over the next year—be it super-sized televisions, automated thermometers, or even robot vacuums.

For the living room, homeowners will continue to see the bar raised for the term “high-definition.”  What was once called “4K” a year ago is now being simplified to “Ultra HDTV,” mainly as manufacturers are heavily promoting the technology as a mainstream standard in the living room for 2013.

Ultra HDTV, or UHDTV, rings in at a whopping 3840 × 2160 pixels, and quadruples the traditional 1080p television sets on market today.

Manufacturers like LG and Sony are planning to launch these sets over the next year—potentially ending up in your living room come next holiday shopping season.

When it comes to previous-year television trends, CES is proving that 3D is a slow-and-dying breed.  Whether it was with overpriced, ugly, 3D glasses that consumers had to purchase separately, or glasses-free 3D televisions that caused headaches, the fad seems to be fizzling out among television manufacturers this year.

Accessory makers are also starting to create UHDTV-compatible add-ons for television sets, which means Canadians will be able to take full advantage of the awe-inspiring and crisp resolution.

As for pricing, manufacturers are leaving that part out.  Analysts are predicting a relatively steep price-point for these units in 2013, so UHDTVs will continue to be for those looking to splurge on a TV that they will not see the full capability for a few years yet.

Rad or fad?  Do you think these larger-than-life TVs will be in your living room anytime soon?  Sound off in the comments below.


Canadian textual phone habits revealed 2

Virgin Mobile Canada finds that as the weather gets cooler, Canadians are turning up the heat – shockingly sending steamy messages at work, church, and even family reunions.

“The facts are in.  Whether it’s sultry or sweet, daters love to have good text in their life,” said Andrew Bridge, managing director at Virgin Mobile Canada.

Courtesy Virgin Mobile Canada

In a survey conducted by Leger Marketing for Virgin Mobile, Canadians feel very strongly for having proper texting etiquette – an increasingly important aspect in relationships and dating.

According to the survey, one in four Canadians say that adding someone on Facebook is usually how they make the first move with a love-interest.

62 per cent of young Canadians report engaging with a prospective lover through text, and 40 per cent believe texting has enhanced their love life.

The survey says the number one place for sending steamy messages is in the office.  30 to 34 year olds are most likely to send “sexy textys” while on the clock.

Canadians surveyed most commonly said that texting made them braver and flirtier.

The survey below gives you a crash course on what matters most to Canadians:

–       Your English teacher was right – grammar does matter!  The number one texting turnoff was bad spelling or grammar when texting with potential dates so watch your spelling carefully.

–       Young Canadians want a side of personality with that text.  Don’t be afraid to let the true you shine in those messages, because texts lacking personality ranked as one of the top texting turnoffs.

–       Slow to respond?  You give flaccid text.  Half of women surveyed shared that a slow response time will get you nowhere because an immediate response to a text screams, “very interested.”  Men, just because the clocks fall behind this season, doesn’t mean you can.  Throw out the “three day rule” playbook and text your lady back already!

–       Poke! Poke! has officially replaced the Ring! Ring!  23 per cent of Canadians who are dating like to use Facebook to make the first move, while only 19 per cent would consider calling a potential suitor.  Time to update that Facebook profile!

When it comes to specific texting trends per province, this is what the survey said:

–       Atlantic Canada deserves a big thumbs award.  More than three quarters (78 per cent) of Maritimers using text messaging to keep in touch with a love interest or significant other.

–       Quebecers are the most patient.  23 per cent thought that waiting a week to respond to a text was playing hard to get.

–       To Ontarians, texting is the new wingman!  Half of Ontarians surveyed say that texting makes their love life better.

–       Manitoba and Saskatchewan residents are too sexy to be shy.  When it comes to sending sexy messages, 42 per cent of them admit to this steamy behavior.

–       B.C., the brave.  British Columbia is home to some of the most fearless Canadians, and we’re not just talking on the slopes.  More than half of west coasters surveyed say they are braver via text.

–       Don’t expect an Albertan to kiss and tell.  When asked how exciting their text life is compared to their sex life – one-fifth didn’t know or preferred not to say.

“More than a third of Canadians first ask someone out via text and one-quarter of Canadians do it via Facebook.  And, almost half of Canadians will send a text to their crush after a first date,” Bridge said.  “Daters are just more comfortable making those first few moves with the right steamy text.”

For a full view of the infographic on Canadian textual phone habits, click here.

**The survey was completed online from August 30th to September 7th, 2012 using Leger Marketing’s online panel, LegerWeb, with a sample of 1045 Canadians aged 18 to 34 who own a mobile phone.  A probability sample of the same size would yield a margin of error of ±3.0 per cent, 19 times out of 20. **